More In Common

How to gain the badge

To gain the badge, members should complete activities from the list below.

  • Hedgehogs, Beavers and Rainbows complete 2 activities
  • Cubs and Brownies complete 3 activities
  • Scouts and Guides complete 4 activities
  • Explorers and Rangers complete 5 activities

Upon completion of the activities, leaders will be able to order the badges ( they are free of charge)  from the County Shop – thecountyshop@birminghamscouts.org.uk

These activities can be adapted for those with inclusion and/or disability needs. If leaders or young people have additional ideas for activities that fit within the ethos of the badge, then please email us at info@birminghamscouts.org.uk and we will include them on the website.

Guidelines

The County Commissioners for both Birmingham Scouts and Guides have agreed that the More in Common badge can be worn on the uniform and will be provided free of charge to members who have completed the requirements. This results from a generous donation in memory of the late Jean Rookes, who worked jointly for many years, with Peter, in working for a friendlier, more compassionate society.

Conscious that there are currently restrictions on how youth groups such as the Scouts and Guides can meet, it is hoped these activities can be carried out during online meetings, and during socially distanced face to face meetings. As the Covid-19 situation develops and we return to more traditional meetings, we will update the badge requirements to add more activities that can be carried out within our communities and allow us to take an active part in the community.

More in Common Guide Nov 2020

Background

The More in Common badge is a partnership between Birmingham Scouts and Guides and the Jo Cox Foundation. The ethos of the badge is to encourage Scouts and Guides to show compassion, kindness and friendship to others, and to reach out across our diverse communities. An introduction to the badge by Kim Ledbetter, Jo’s sister can be found on the Birmingham Scouts YouTube Channel and the work of the Jo Cox Foundation can be found on their website.

Jo Cox Foundation Website

Activities

Find a care home near where you live, either one where older people, or people with a learning disability, live

Cut a piece of card of any pale colour to your preferred size – perhaps 15cm square

Draw something suitable on the front, maybe flowers, trees, your place of worship, your scout flag

Write a suitable message on the inside wishing the residents well and thanking the staff for their hard work, particularly during the pandemic

Include an address in case they wish to reply

Identify a scout or guide group to whom you would like to send a message

You may want some of your friends to join you in making the video

Think about what you want to say about your group and some of your activities in the community, and write them down.

Include some questions that you can ask about their group

Record your video, which should be between 2-5 minutes  on your mobile phone and send it by WhatsApp, or similar medium to your chosen group.

Decide on the shape and size of your flag

Decide on which faiths you want to include: the most common are Christian, Muslin, Sikh, Hindu, Jewish, and Buddhist

Look each one up on an internet search engine and find their emblems or logos, and decide how you want to display them

Use the back of a roll of wallpaper and cut off a piece up to 1 metre in length

Think about how your family, your school, and your community have been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic

You can ask other people about their experiences and you can note stories from the news and TV programmes

Create images to show this on your collage. You can use poster paint, felt tips, coloured pencils, or paste images on to your collage

Think about how people around you have been affected by the pandemic, and what you have heard on the news.

Aim for 16 lines in your poem - this can be any number of lines in your verses, such as 4 verses of 4 lines each

Consider which words are going to rhyme – quite often it will be the end words of the 1st and 2nd and 3rd and 4th lines, or maybe the 2nd and 4th lines.

This could be someone you meet at school

Explain to him or her what you are doing and ask their permission before asking them any questions

Also explain to your teacher what you are doing

Ask questions like how many brothers and sisters does he or she have, older or younger, what is his or her religion, where does he or she attend for worship, Does he or she have to wear special clothes, or eat special food. what does he or she do with their spare time. Does he/she pray, other than when he/she attends their place of worship

This could be someone you meet at school

Explain to him or her what you are doing and ask his/her permission before asking any questions. Be careful to ask your questions in a sympathetic way.

Also explain to your teacher what you are doing

Ask questions like how does his/her disability or impairment affect his/her daily life

What activities are more difficult because of his/her impairment – does he/she need help with any of them

How do other people react to him/her when they realise that he/she has a disability or impairment

This could be someone you meet at school

Explain to him or her what you are doing and ask his/her permission before asking any questions.

Also explain to your teacher what you are doing

Ask questions like how old was he/she when he/she moved to Birmingham and does he/she know why the move took place

Ask where he/she moved from

Ask him/her how he/she felt when he /she first realised that he/she was going to leave his/her previous home

Ask about his/her first impressions of Birmingham

Ask how he/she found making new friends

This could be someone you meet at school

Explain to him or her what you are doing and ask his/her permission before asking any questions. . Be careful to ask your questions in a sympathetic way.

Also explain to your teacher what you are doing

Ask questions like how old was he/she when he/she moved to Birmingham and does he/she know why the move took place

Ask where he/she moved from

Ask him/her how he/she felt when he /she first realised that he/she was going to leave his/her previous home

Ask about his/her first impressions of Birmingham

Ask how he/she found making new friends

Watch one of Sir David Attenborough’s programmes on YouTube

Note some of his points about the planet is changing

Think carefully about actions you could take to improve the situation, such as using less plastic, encouraging people around you to dispose of their rubbish responsibly, write an article or blog to influence other people, ask your local councillor or MP to make a particular change.

Make and carry out 3 specific pledges of actions you will take

Type the Jo Cox Foundation into your internet search engine

Scroll down to ‘About Jo Cox’ and read about Jo’s life and the causes that she was passionate about

Make some notes of key points

Think about what it is in Jo’s life that inspire you

Make a 2 minute video on your mobile phone and send it to some of your friends, who have expressed an interest in what you are doing

Find out where your local Foodbank is located, which is likely to be at a place of worship or community centre

Ask the Foodbank what food items they need

In a socially distanced way, arrange to collect some of these items from your friends and family, and deliver to the Foodbank.

Any questions?

Please contact

info@birminghamscouts.org.uk

Find a group

Find your local Scout group based on your post code to get involved today!

scouts.org.uk/get-involved